Catalog

Record Details

Catalog Search




Book

The shelter and the fence : when 982 Holocaust refugees found safe haven in America / Norman H. Finkelstein.

Available copies

  • 2 of 2 copies available at Sage Library System.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Umatilla County Public Libraries. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Pendleton Public Library. (Show)

Current holds

0 current holds with 2 total copies.

Summary:

"In 1944, at the height of World War II, 982 European refugees found a temporary haven at Fort Ontario in Oswego, New York. They were men, women, and children who had spent frightening years one step ahead of Nazi pursuers and death. They spoke nineteen different languages, and, while most of the refugees were Jewish, a number were Catholic, Greek Orthodox, and Protestant Christians. From the time they arrived at the Fort Ontario Emergency Refugee Shelter on August 5 they began re-creating their lives and embarked on the road to becoming American citizens. In the history of World War II and the Holocaust, this “token” save by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the War Refugee Board was too little and too late for millions. But for those few who reached Oswego it was life changing. The Shelter and the Fence tells their stories."--Amazon.com.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Pendleton Public Library X 362.87089 F495 (Text) 37801000681062 Juvenile Non-Fiction Book System_Only_3months 07/23/2021 Available -
Hood River County Library J 362.87 FIN (Text) 33892100745711 Children's New Books Book None 07/29/2021 Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781641603836
  • ISBN: 1641603836
  • Physical Description: 186 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Publisher: Chicago, Illinois : Chicago Review Press, [2021]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary, etc.:
"In 1944, at the height of World War II, 982 European refugees found a temporary haven at Fort Ontario in Oswego, New York. They were men, women, and children who had spent frightening years one step ahead of Nazi pursuers and death. They spoke nineteen different languages, and, while most of the refugees were Jewish, a number were Catholic, Greek Orthodox, and Protestant Christians. From the time they arrived at the Fort Ontario Emergency Refugee Shelter on August 5 they began re-creating their lives and embarked on the road to becoming American citizens. In the history of World War II and the Holocaust, this “token” save by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and the War Refugee Board was too little and too late for millions. But for those few who reached Oswego it was life changing. The Shelter and the Fence tells their stories."--Amazon.com.
Subject: Jewish refugees > New York (State) > Oswego > Juvenile literature.
Jews > New York (State) > Oswego > Juvenile literature.
World War, 1939-1945 > Jews > Rescue > Juvenile literature.
United States > Emigration and immigration > Juvenile literature.
Oswego (N.Y.) > Ethnic relations > Juvenile literature.

Additional Resources