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Sisters in hate : American women on the front line of white nationalism.

Darby, Seyward, (author.).

Available copies

  • 2 of 2 copies available at Sage Library System. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Umatilla County Public Libraries.
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Pendleton Public Library. (Show)

Current holds

0 current holds with 2 total copies.

Summary:

"After the election of Donald J. Trump, journalist Seyward Darby went looking for the women of the so-called "alt-right" -- really just white nationalism with a new label. The mainstream media depicted the alt-right as a bastion of angry white men, but was it? As women headlined resistance to the Trump administration's bigotry and sexism, most notably at the Women's Marches, Darby wanted to know why others were joining a movement espousing racism and anti-feminism. Who were these women, and what did their activism reveal about America's past, present, and future? Darby researched dozens of women across the country before settling on three -- Corinna Olsen, Ayla Stewart, and Lana Lokteff. Each was born in 1979, and became a white nationalist in the post-9/11 era. Their respective stories of radicalization upend much of what we assume about women, politics, and political extremism.--Amazon.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Pendleton Public Library 305.409 D242 (Text) 37801000666071 Adult Non-Fiction Book None 09/30/2020 Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780316487771 (hbk.)
  • ISBN: 0316487775 (hbk.)
  • Physical Description: 309 pages ; 24 cm
  • Edition: First edition.
  • Publisher: New York : Little Brown and Company, 2020.

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages 267-293) and index.
Summary, etc.:
"After the election of Donald J. Trump, journalist Seyward Darby went looking for the women of the so-called "alt-right" -- really just white nationalism with a new label. The mainstream media depicted the alt-right as a bastion of angry white men, but was it? As women headlined resistance to the Trump administration's bigotry and sexism, most notably at the Women's Marches, Darby wanted to know why others were joining a movement espousing racism and anti-feminism. Who were these women, and what did their activism reveal about America's past, present, and future? Darby researched dozens of women across the country before settling on three -- Corinna Olsen, Ayla Stewart, and Lana Lokteff. Each was born in 1979, and became a white nationalist in the post-9/11 era. Their respective stories of radicalization upend much of what we assume about women, politics, and political extremism.--Amazon.
Subject: Women > Political activity > United States > 21st century.
White supremacy movements > United States > History > 21st century.
Right-wing extremists > United States > History > 21st century.
United States > Politics and government > 2017-

Additional Resources