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American Sherlock : murder, forensics, and the birth of American CSI / Kate Winkler Dawson.

Available copies

  • 5 of 6 copies available at Sage Library System. (Show)
  • 3 of 3 copies available at Umatilla County Public Libraries. (Show)
  • 1 of 1 copy available at Pendleton Public Library.

Current holds

0 current holds with 6 total copies.

Summary:

Berkeley, California, 1933. In a lab filled with curiosities--beakers, microscopes, Bunsen burners, and hundreds upon hundreds of books--sat an investigator who would go on to crack at least two thousand cases in his forty-year career. Known as the "American Sherlock Holmes," Edward Oscar Heinrich was one of America's greatest--and first--forensic scientists, with an uncanny knack for finding clues, establishing evidence, and deducing answers with a skill that seemed almost supernatural. Heinrich was one of the nation's first expert witnesses, working in a time when the turmoil of Prohibition led to sensationalized crime reporting and only a small, systematic study of evidence. However with his brilliance, and commanding presence in both the courtroom and at crime scenes, Heinrich spearheaded the invention of a myriad of new forensic tools that police still use today, including blood spatter analysis, ballistics, lie-detector tests, and the use of fingerprints as courtroom evidence. His work, though not without its serious--some would say fatal--flaws, changed the course of American criminal investigation. Based on years of research and thousands of never-before-published primary source materials, American Sherlock captures the life of the man who pioneered the science our legal system now relies upon--as well as the limits of those techniques and the very human experts who wield them. -- from book jacket.
Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Circulation Modifier Age Hold Protection Active/Create Date Status Due Date
Pendleton Public Library 363,25092 D325 (Text) 37801000668465 Adult Non-Fiction Book None 06/02/2020 Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9780525539551
  • Physical Description: 325 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Publisher: New York : G. P. Putnam's Sons, [2020]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references (pages [279]-313) and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
Prologue: tales from the archive: pistols, jawbones, and love poetry -- A bloody mess: the case of Allene Lamson's bath, part I -- Genius: the case of Oscar Heinrich's demons -- Heathen: the case of the Baker's handwriting, part I -- Pioneer: the case of the Baker's handwriting, part II -- Damnation: the case of the star's fingerprints, part I -- Indignation: the case of the star's fingerprints, part II -- Double 13: the case of the great train heist -- Bad chemistry: the case of the calculating chemist -- Bits and pieces: the case of Bessie Ferguson's ear -- Triggered: the case of Marty Colwell's gun -- Damned: the case of Allene lamson's Bath, part II.
Summary, etc.:
Berkeley, California, 1933. In a lab filled with curiosities--beakers, microscopes, Bunsen burners, and hundreds upon hundreds of books--sat an investigator who would go on to crack at least two thousand cases in his forty-year career. Known as the "American Sherlock Holmes," Edward Oscar Heinrich was one of America's greatest--and first--forensic scientists, with an uncanny knack for finding clues, establishing evidence, and deducing answers with a skill that seemed almost supernatural. Heinrich was one of the nation's first expert witnesses, working in a time when the turmoil of Prohibition led to sensationalized crime reporting and only a small, systematic study of evidence. However with his brilliance, and commanding presence in both the courtroom and at crime scenes, Heinrich spearheaded the invention of a myriad of new forensic tools that police still use today, including blood spatter analysis, ballistics, lie-detector tests, and the use of fingerprints as courtroom evidence. His work, though not without its serious--some would say fatal--flaws, changed the course of American criminal investigation. Based on years of research and thousands of never-before-published primary source materials, American Sherlock captures the life of the man who pioneered the science our legal system now relies upon--as well as the limits of those techniques and the very human experts who wield them. -- from book jacket.
Subject: Heinrich, Edward Oscar, 1881-1953.
Criminologists > United States > Biography.
Forensic sciences > United States > History.
Genre: Biographies.

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